Country FilesCentralCountry Profile 2014: CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Wed,22Nov2017

Posted on Friday, 07 February 2014 12:56

Country Profile 2014: CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

alt After the année terrible

The year 2013 brought political upheaval and economic destruction to the Central African Republic (CAR), so 2014 is set to be a year of reconstruction, if the international community brings its support and aid. The Seleka rebel coalition overthrew President François Bozizé in March, and the situation deteriorated into a state of low-level conflict throughout the country despite the presence of peacekeepers from France and several Central African countries. The state’s authority and the private sector’s economic production have both become weakened to the point of barely existing.

 

 TABLE OF CONTENTS :

TOP CENTRAL AFRICAN COMPANIES

TOP CENTRAL AFRICAN BANKS

 

ar-infographie-central-african-rep-2014After the année terrible

Elections to end the transitional government should happen in 2015

Foreign investors have pulled out, and there is a serious humanitarian crisis

The year 2013 brought political upheaval and economic destruction to the Central African Republic (CAR), so 2014 is set to be a year of reconstruction, if the international community brings its support and aid. The Seleka rebel coalition overthrew President François Bozizé in March, and the situation deteriorated into a state of low-level conflict throughout the country despite the presence of peacekeepers from France and several Central African countries. The state’s authority and the private sector’s economic production have both become weakened to the point of barely existing.

The rebels–many of whom come from Chad and Sudan – sacked and looted their way to Bangui in early 2013, and even small-scale farmers have stopped much of their activity due to the in security that continues to reign. Interim President Michel Djotodia and many of the Seleka rebels are Muslims and the majority of the population are Christian, adding a religious dimension to the communal violence that took place.

CONFLICT DIAMONDS

Because the country’s mines are controlled by armed groups, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative suspended the CAR in April 2013. That hurt the economy because about one quarter of the population depends on the sector. The government said in September that it had reopened negotiations with the institution to discuss how it could be readmitted. The diamond watchdog, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, also suspended the country. The government announced in June that it had banned the diamond trade in order to implement new controls on the sector and to end suspicion that conflict diamonds were being sold. There have long been doubts about the management of the diamond sector in the country due to corruption and the presence of rebel groups in mining areas. Djotodia used revenue from the diamond trade to launch the rebellion, so his claims to cleaning up the sector may not be genuine.

About 80% of aid to the CAR normally comes from the European Union, but that aid has been suspended. The same goes for the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the African Development Bank. John Ging of the United Nations (UN) Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs described the situation as a tragedy in October 2013. Humanitarian aid agencies announced their return to the country in late October. Financial institutions also said at the UN meetings in New York in September that they had relaunched contact with the government. Transitional President Djotodia says that “the public purse is empty”, so donor re-engagement is crucial for the country’s prospects.

UNEASY TRANSITION

The coming year will be a decisive one. The most immediate challenges are to re-establish security and to respond to the humanitarian crisis. Then there is the task of getting the economy back on its feet. More than 10% of the population has been displaced by the fighting.

The government plans to organise a constitutional referendum and revise the electoral register in 2014. Elections are to be held by early 2015 at the latest, according to the French government, which has lobbied the UN Security Council to take a more active role in resolving the crisis. Much of the situation remains in flux, and Bozizé has said he could at some point return, which would complicate the transition further. Pro-Bozizé rebels continue to fight Seleka’s forces in his native region of Bossangoa. In the meantime, Djotodia has been trying to buy off some of the rebel leaders who helped to bring him to power and has officially disbanded the Seleka coalition.

The Union des Forces Démocratiques pour le Rassemblement, the Convention des Patriotes pour la Justice et la Paix and the Convention Patriotique du Salut du Kodro formed the coalition in August 2012. As the rebellion against Bozizé grew, so did Seleka’s ranks. The government estimated that it numbered about 25,000 fighters. That leaves a tremendous challenge in terms of their demobilisation and reintegration, the more so because many rebel leaders have formed their own local militias. Self-defence groups have also been springing up, adding to the mix of actors seeking to influence the country’s future direction.

 TOP CENTRAL AFRICAN COMPANIES

No companies from Central African Republic featured in The Africa's Report's Top 500 Companies in Africa 2013.

 

 TOP CENTRAL AFRICAN BANKS

 

No banks from Central African Republic featured in The Africa's Report's Top 200 Banks in Africa 2012.

 



Subscriptions Digital EditionSubscriptions PrintEdition

FRONTLINE

NEWS

POLITICS

HEALTH

SPORTS

BUSINESS

SOCIETY

TECHNOLOGY

COLUMNISTS

Music & Film

SOAPBOX

Newsletters

Keep up to date with the latest from our network :

subscribe2

Connect with us