In DepthColumns

Fri,24Nov2017

Columns

Obama in Ghana: The world is what you make of it

Gemma Ware

President Barack Obama’s engagement with Ghana was not only warm but showed promise of deepening the debate about what Africa needs to move forward

 

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Climate Change: Africa fights back on its own terms

Gemma Ware

An energetic array of green initiatives is sprouting up across Africa to protect natural resources, harness sustainable energy and spur green growth.

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Ghana/US: A stormy relationship comes good

Gemma Ware

Relations between Accra and Washington have see-sawed between extremes. 

 

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The Akan shrine near the White House

Gemma Ware

How some African-Americans in Washington DC look to Ghana for spiritual enlightenment as well as contact with ?the ancestors and the African gods of nature

 

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The long view: South America's conditional cash transfer experience

Gemma Ware

Cash rewards to families that send their kids to school and try to keep them healthy have proven successful; their application in Brazil is now being reassessed to make them work better

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Proponents of aid fight back

Gemma Ware


In the worst financial crisis since the 1930s,  arguments over the role of foreign aid are central to the debate over Africa’s policy options. In London on 7 April, Ghana’s President John Atta Mills insisted that he was on a mission to negotiate trade and investment and not looking for aid, adding that the crisis would force Africa to become more self-reliant: “I am not returning to Ghana with my pockets full of pounds sterling. We will have to import less food and grow more locally.”


 

After The Africa Report interviewed Zambian economist Dambisa Moyo, author of ‘Dead Aid’, which advocates the rapid phasing-out of the foreign-aid cycle in Africa, the debate was joined by development economists, finance ministers and officials in international financial institutions.

 


The IMF’s Africa director, Antoinette Sayeh, also took a strong stance on proposed aid cuts: “Aid has been shown to have a very positive impact on growth and poverty reduction in Africa. We think it’s actually dangerous to suggest that the appropriate response to Africa’s problems at this very difficult time is to further deprive AIDS patients and young people, who’ve been out of school for a decade because of a civil war, of access to education and health.”

 

Back to Africa & the crisis: A way out of the tunnel

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