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Sudan: Attempted coup stopped by security forces say ruling council, 40 arrested

By Morris Kiruga
Posted on Tuesday, 21 September 2021 12:23

Sudanese march against paramilitary Rapid Support Forces
Sudanese take part in a march against the Rapid Support Forces, who they blame for a raid on protesters who had camped outside the defense ministry during the 2019 revolution, in Khartoum, Sudan, June 3, 2021. (file photo) REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudan’s transitional council has announced that it thwarted an attempted coup at dawn on Tuesday 21 September. They are blaming supporters of toppled president Omar al-Bashir.

In separate statements, Sudan’s state media and a top council official said that the “situation is under control” and that those involved in the coup attempt have been arrested. Although little is still known about the participants, early reports indicate that it involved members of the Armored Corps, and that at least 40 officers have been arrested.

A government spokesman later said on state TV that the coup plotters include ‘remnants’ of the Bashir regime.

Several government sources told AFP that the country’s security agencies received information about the planned coup on Monday 20 September evening, providing sufficient time to thwart the dawn attempt on multiple government institutions including state TV headquarters, and army headquarters.

Brazen attack

The failed coup is the most brazen attack on the country’s shaky transitional council, which includes both civilian and military representatives. The council took over after the ousting former president Omar al-Bashir in 2019, but it has struggled to provide solutions to the major problems that finally undid the long-serving dictator’s three-decade reign.

It has also been fighting back pro-Bashir forces. In June, authorities in Khartoum detained more than 200 members of the former ruling party. It said they had been “preparing for acts of destruction”, echoing similar sentiments made by Abdalla Hamdok, Sudan’s Prime Minister, just weeks before.

Likewise, the protests in June against an IMF-brokered debt deal, which would see higher costs of basic goods on the population, saw hundreds take to the streets across Sudan demanding the government resign.

Some analysts believe Bashir’s backers are piggybacking on social discontent to boost his case – his trial is due to restart shortly.

Old school coup

The coup attempt will remind those Sudanese from the older generations of the 1960-1970s era, after soldiers on Monday seized the radio station in Omdurman along with demonstrators blocking key roads around Port Sudan, while life in Khartoum continued  largely oblivious to such developments.

More on this story as it develops

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