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Arms Trade: US to remove Nigeria from Leahy Law restriction

By Desmond Kokim
Posted on Tuesday, 4 August 2015 11:44

The Leahy amendment prohibits the U.S. Department of State and Department of Defense from providing military assistance to foreign military units that violate human rights with impunity.

we have begun the process of lifting restriction under the Leahy Law

The Leahy Law was imposed on Nigeria following allegations of human rights abuses by the Nigerian military in the fight against terrorism.

Reports emerging from Washington DC suggest Nigeria was likely to be taken off the Leahy Law restrictions.

US congressman, Darell Issah, made the disclosure after a meeting with a Nigerian delegation comprising Defence ministry permanent secretary, Alhaji Aliyu Ismaila, service chiefs, navy and air force and National Defence College commandant Rear Admiral Agholor, and the chief of defence staff, Major General Olonishakin.

“There were a number of things that were discussed at the meeting but basically the need for additional technical support including overhead surveillance. This was discussed because it is important in the fight against Boko Haram,” Issah told reporters.

“This is because of the trust in the new regime, which has begun the process of ensuring that the military’s professionalism in the battle field is made in a way that we all can be confident that the rule of law is followed.

“Following this development, we have begun the process of lifting restriction under the Leahy Law but the vast majority of the support U.S. provides will be given regardless of the restrictions,” Issah added.

The U.S. government does not generally report on foreign armed force units it has cut off from receiving assistance.
However, press reports have indicated that Bangladesh, Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, Turkey, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Nigeria, have been denied assistance due to the Leahy Law.

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