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Nigeria to allocate $180m more in capital spending

By Chijioke Ohuocha, Camillus Eboh and Felix Onuah
Posted on Friday, 19 August 2016 10:24

Africa’s largest economy is in the middle of its worst financial crisis for decades as a slump in oil revenues hammers public finances and the naira.

The central bank governor has said recession is likely. Government capital spending so far has exceeded 400 billion naira this year, Adeosun said, despite the record budget being held up for months by wrangling between President Muhammadu Buhari and parliament.

Nigeria will need to combine monetary policies with fiscal and structural policies in order to overcome its worst economic crisis in decades and return to growth, President Muhammadu Buhari said on Thursday.

Nigeria is in the middle of its worst crisis in decades as a slump in oil revenues hammers public finances and the naira. Gross domestic product shrank in the first quarter and the central bank governor has said a recession is likely.

“We fully understand that monetary policy alone is not sufficient to bring about desired economic growth,” Buhari told a meeting of African central bank governors in Abuja. “For us in Nigeria, while we recognise the challenges we are confronting … we are determined to diversify the economy away from the excessive reliance on oil and other primary products.”

Economists have criticised Buhari and the government for not doing enough to address the crisis.

Nigeria’s central bank raised interest rates last month, and has been soaking up liquidity in order to support the naira, which has lost around 40 percent of its value since it was floated in June.

Buhari said the continent was confronted with slowing growth, weakening demand, rising inflation, restrictions to capital flows, rising debt levels, increases in exchange rate volatility and a depletion of foreign reserves.

The central bank governors were meeting to discuss ways to safeguard their economies from the expected unwinding of loose monetary policies in the leading developed economies.

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